Dr. James Jude honored for 50 years of CPR

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by Theresa Andrus
Maple Lake may be a small town, but that doesn’t mean its people can’t go on to do big things.  And former resident Dr. James Roderick Jude has gone on to do more than his share of big things. 
Jude is a retired cardiac and thoracic surgeon. But he most notably made his mark on the world as the co-developer of the life-saving technique of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
In May of this year, Dr. Jude received the AXA Advisors Lifetime Achievement Award during the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce’s 2011 Health Care Heroes Awards. Jude is a former professor of surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. 
And in November of 2010, Jude was honored at “The Beat Goes On: 50 Years of CPR” hosted by the Center for a Healthy Maryland to honor the pioneers who developed CPR. 
In December of 2010, Jude attended a 50th anniversary CPR celebration presented by the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update 2010 to the Citizen CPR Foundation where he met heart attack survivors saved by CPR. 
James Jude was born on June 7, 1928, the son of Bernard and Cecilia Jude of Maple Lake. He graduated from Maple Lake High School in 1946 and obtained his undergraduate degree from the College of St. Thomas in St. Paul. He graduated from the University of Minnesota School of Medicine in 1953 and interned at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, the home town of his wife, Sallye. 
Jude said it was a teacher at Maple Lake High School who set him on the path into medicine.
“I had a teacher in high school, a Mrs. Hamm,” Jude said. “She had us write about what we wanted to be and I wrote a dissertation on that I wanted to be a doctor. And I don’t know why. I suppose it was because we had a local doctor, Dr. (S.J.) Raetz, who impressed me. And there was another local doctor whose name I can’t remember. They were general practitioners and I always thought I’d practice in a small town like Maple Lake.”
However, Jude said returning to the home town of his wife, Sallye, became the goal that changed his life. 
“She’s from Baltimore so I looked to the east a little bit more and applied at several medical schools.”
Jude remained at Johns Hopkins for his residency in general, thoracic and cardiac surgery in 1954, and served as Chief Surgical Resident from 1960 to 1961. During this period of time, he also spent two years in the Public Health Service with the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. 
“That was during the Korean War and they were breathing down my neck to enlist,” Jude laughed. “But I looked at NIH and at that time, working in public health was equivalent to military service.”
Jude said he would perform his NIH duties during the week, coming back to Johns Hopkins to continue his research on the weekends.
It was at Johns Hopkins that three researchers connected their separate projects into a life-saving discovery.
Jude said his research was related to hypothermia and he developed a technique that could restart the heart by introducing hot blood into the aeorta. In discussions with graduate student Guy Knickbocker, Jude learned about his work with Dr. William Kouwenhoven and their efforts to develop an external defibrillator by applying electrodes to the chests of dogs. 
Jude, Kouwenhoven and Knickbocker discovered that forceful, rhythmic pressure on the chest could cause enough blood to move through the body to sustain the vital organs in emergency situations. The first documented and successful case of their method being used on a human patient, a 35-year-old woman, came in July of 1959.
In 1960 the results of the studies were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and reported that 70 percent of patients receiving the prodecure survived. 
In the early 1960s, Jude and Kouwenhoven traveled across the U.S. presenting their method of external cardiac massage, which was combined with mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to create CPR. In 1962, Jude, Kouwenhoven and Knickbocker received the Hektoen Gold Medal from the American Medical Association for their work. In 1963, the CPR technique was formally endorsed by the American Heart Association. 
In 1962, Jude was named one of the “Ten Outstanding Young Men in America” by the Junior Chamber of Commerce (Jaycees).
Jude was named as Assistant Professor of Surgery at Johns Hopkins in 1962 and in 1964 he became a full Professor of Surgery at the University of Miami and a Clinical Professor of Surgery at the University of Miami in 1971. As the head of cardiovascular and thoracic surgery, Jude oversaw a veterans hospital, did research, but primarily taught while also practicing medicine in two offices.
Jude, who retired in 2000, is the father of seven children, five of whom live in South Florida, and has 13 grandchildren.
Although he hasn’t returned to Maple Lake in many years, Jude said he has traveled to various events related to his research. One of the most memorable was produced by the Citizen CPR Foundation, which brought together 50 people from the very young to very old who owed their lives to CPR. 
And there are other lives Jude saved through his work as a heart surgeon.
“I hear every year from a patient I operated on years ago,” Jude said. “He writes at Christmastime to tell me how he’s doing.”
In addition to his most recent honors, Jude was presented with the Award of Merit by the Americian Heart Association in 1969 and received the Helen B. Taussig Award from the Maryland affiliate of the American Heart Association in 1974. In 2006 he was named as a Hopkins Scholar.
Earlier this year, Jude and Knickerbocker received the Lifetime Achievement Award for Cardiac Resuscitation Science at the Recuscitation Science Symposium, which pointed to the thousands of lives throughout the world that have been saved through the use of CPR.
Maple Lake may be a small town, but that doesn’t mean its people can’t go on to do big things.  And former resident Dr. James Roderick Jude has gone on to do more than his share of big things. 
Jude is a retired cardiac and thoracic surgeon. But he most notably made his mark on the world as the co-developer of the life-saving technique of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
In May of this year, Dr. Jude received the AXA Advisors Lifetime Achievement Award during the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce’s 2011 Health Care Heroes Awards. Jude is a former professor of surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. 
And in November of 2010, Jude was honored at “The Beat Goes On: 50 Years of CPR” hosted by the Center for a Healthy Maryland to honor the pioneers who developed CPR. 
In December of 2010, Jude attended a 50th anniversary CPR celebration presented by the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update 2010 to the Citizen CPR Foundation where he met heart attack survivors saved by CPR. 
James Jude was born on June 7, 1928, the son of Bernard and Cecilia Jude of Maple Lake. He graduated from Maple Lake High School in 1946 and obtained his undergraduate degree from the College of St. Thomas in St. Paul. He graduated from the University of Minnesota School of Medicine in 1953 and interned at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, the home town of his wife, Sallye. 
Jude said it was a teacher at Maple Lake High School who set him on the path into medicine.
And in November of 2010, Jude was honored at “The Beat Goes On: 50 Years of CPR” hosted by the Center for a Healthy Maryland to honor the pioneers who developed CPR. 
In December of 2010, Jude attended a 50th anniversary CPR celebration presented by the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update 2010 to the Citizen CPR Foundation where he met heart attack survivors saved by CPR. 
More information appears in this week's Messenger.
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