Local family wins Barn of the Year award

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A barn brought back from the edge of demolition in Albion Township has been named a Minnesota Barn of the Year for 2010.
The Friends of Minnesota Barns selected a barn owned by Eric and Shelly Liljequist of Maple Lake as the Barn of the Year in the Farm Use category. 
The purpose of the Barn of the Year award is to recognize barn owners who have made efforts to preserve their barns and help to provide preservation examples and ideas to other barn owners. There are two categories in the competition: Farm Use is for barns actively used to store grains or farm machinery or to house farm animals; Non-Farm Use is for barns used for other purposes.
When the Liljequists were looking for a farm in 2005 after 13 years in the home they built in Orono, a place with a barn was central to their plans.
“We spent four to six months looking for farms in a big circle around the Twin Cities,” Shelly said. “We wanted a farm with a real farmhouse and a real barn.
“Ever since I was six, I wanted to live on a farm,” she laughed. “I wanted to have a horse just like Mr. Ed.”
The horse is still a goal for the future, but the farm with a barn has been achieved. 
And it wasn’t easy. 
A barn brought back from the edge of demolition in Albion Township has been named a Minnesota Barn of the Year for 2010.
The Friends of Minnesota Barns selected a barn owned by Eric and Shelly Liljequist of Maple Lake as the Barn of the Year in the Farm Use category. 
The purpose of the Barn of the Year award is to recognize barn owners who have made efforts to preserve their barns and help to provide preservation examples and ideas to other barn owners. There are two categories in the competition: Farm Use is for barns actively used to store grains or farm machinery or to house farm animals; Non-Farm Use is for barns used for other purposes.
When the Liljequists were looking for a farm in 2005 after 13 years in the home they built in Orono, a place with a barn was central to their plans.
“We spent four to six months looking for farms in a big circle around the Twin Cities,” Shelly said. “We wanted a farm with a real farmhouse and a real barn.
“Ever since I was six, I wanted to live on a farm,” she laughed. “I wanted to have a horse just like Mr. Ed.”
The horse is still a goal for the future, but the farm with a barn has been achieved. 
And it wasn’t easy. 
More information appears in this week's Messenger. 
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