Drought 2.0?

 

“It’s dry. What else do you want to know?”
That’s how University of Minnesota Extension Crops Educator Dave Nicholi begins crop conversations lately. Monday’s United States Department of Agriculture Crops and Weather Report adds context to those conversations.
Throughout the state, 69 percent of topsoil is considered to have short or very short moisture. Furthermore, subsoil moisture is considered short or very short in 61 percent of the state. No topsoil or subsoil moisture levels in the state are classified as surplus.
“In central Minnesota, I heard a guy on public radio saying if they didn’t irrigate in Sherburne County, there wouldn’t be anything,” Nicholi said. “In Dakota County, where I am, there are soybeans that are dead. They’re not coming back.”
The latest U.S. Drought Monitor report, released Sept. 5, paints a picture of just how dry central Minnesota is: all of Sherburne and Meeker counties are in a severe drought, along with the majority of Wright, Kandiyohi, Stearns, Benton and McCleod counties and a portion of Mille Lacs, Pope, Swift, McLeod, Isanti and Anoka counties.
More information appears in this week's Messenger.
 
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